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  • Gogotte, Fontainebleau, France

    Gogottes: A Rift in Time

    Click here to view a video on Gogottes: A Rift in Time

    The current exhibition represents a milestone in the gallery’s history, insofar as it is the first dedicated solely to a phenomenon of nature. Gogottes are rare and intriguing sandstone concretions found in an area near Fontainebleau, in northern France. Louis XIV of France was fascinated by them and a number were used to adorn the gardens at Versailles.
     
    The fascination with natural forms and phenomena is a recurring characteristic found in Chinese cultural history and philosophy. From the Song Dynasty (960-1279), the elite and scholar classes brought natural forms, such as rocks, into the domestic context to be admired and to provide inspiration. This was a golden period for the arts where nature fed into philosophy, poetry, calligraphy and painting. Natural forms continue to be collected today. 
     
    In preparing the catalogue, we searched for the perspectives of both a naturalist and an artist to expand our thoughts on these uncanny stones and the affinity they offer between nature and art. We are deeply honoured that the two friends of forty years, Sir David Attenborough and Tom Phillips, agreed to focus their masterly attention on these intriguing geological creations. Their passion, curiosity and energy are a true inspiration. 

    Please click here to view our concurrent exhibition 'Song: Chinese Ceramics, 10th to 13th Century (part 5)'

    Gogotte, Fontainebleau, France

    Height: 68.0cm
    Width: 83.0cm
    Depth: 23.5cm

  • Gogotte, Fontainebleau, France

    Gogottes: A Rift in Time

    Click here to view a video on Gogottes: A Rift in Time

    The current exhibition represents a milestone in the gallery’s history, insofar as it is the first dedicated solely to a phenomenon of nature. Gogottes are rare and intriguing sandstone concretions found in an area near Fontainebleau, in northern France. Louis XIV of France was fascinated by them and a number were used to adorn the gardens at Versailles.
     
    The fascination with natural forms and phenomena is a recurring characteristic found in Chinese cultural history and philosophy. From the Song Dynasty (960-1279), the elite and scholar classes brought natural forms, such as rocks, into the domestic context to be admired and to provide inspiration. This was a golden period for the arts where nature fed into philosophy, poetry, calligraphy and painting. Natural forms continue to be collected today. 
     
    In preparing the catalogue, we searched for the perspectives of both a naturalist and an artist to expand our thoughts on these uncanny stones and the affinity they offer between nature and art. We are deeply honoured that the two friends of forty years, Sir David Attenborough and Tom Phillips, agreed to focus their masterly attention on these intriguing geological creations. Their passion, curiosity and energy are a true inspiration. 

    Please click here to view our concurrent exhibition 'Song: Chinese Ceramics, 10th to 13th Century (part 5)'

    Gogotte, Fontainebleau, France

    Height: 49.0cm
    Width: 43.0cm
    Depth: 25.0cm

  • Gogotte, Fontainebleau, France

    Gogottes: A Rift in Time

    Click here to view a video on Gogottes: A Rift in Time

    The current exhibition represents a milestone in the gallery’s history, insofar as it is the first dedicated solely to a phenomenon of nature. Gogottes are rare and intriguing sandstone concretions found in an area near Fontainebleau, in northern France. Louis XIV of France was fascinated by them and a number were used to adorn the gardens at Versailles.
     
    The fascination with natural forms and phenomena is a recurring characteristic found in Chinese cultural history and philosophy. From the Song Dynasty (960-1279), the elite and scholar classes brought natural forms, such as rocks, into the domestic context to be admired and to provide inspiration. This was a golden period for the arts where nature fed into philosophy, poetry, calligraphy and painting. Natural forms continue to be collected today. 
     
    In preparing the catalogue, we searched for the perspectives of both a naturalist and an artist to expand our thoughts on these uncanny stones and the affinity they offer between nature and art. We are deeply honoured that the two friends of forty years, Sir David Attenborough and Tom Phillips, agreed to focus their masterly attention on these intriguing geological creations. Their passion, curiosity and energy are a true inspiration. 

    Please click here to view our concurrent exhibition 'Song: Chinese Ceramics, 10th to 13th Century (part 5)'

    Gogotte, Fontainebleau, France

    Height: 55.0cm
    Width: 71.0cm
    Depth: 32.0cm

  • Gogotte, Fontainebleau, France

    Gogottes: A Rift in Time

    Click here to view a video on Gogottes: A Rift in Time

    The current exhibition represents a milestone in the gallery’s history, insofar as it is the first dedicated solely to a phenomenon of nature. Gogottes are rare and intriguing sandstone concretions found in an area near Fontainebleau, in northern France. Louis XIV of France was fascinated by them and a number were used to adorn the gardens at Versailles.
     
    The fascination with natural forms and phenomena is a recurring characteristic found in Chinese cultural history and philosophy. From the Song Dynasty (960-1279), the elite and scholar classes brought natural forms, such as rocks, into the domestic context to be admired and to provide inspiration. This was a golden period for the arts where nature fed into philosophy, poetry, calligraphy and painting. Natural forms continue to be collected today. 
     
    In preparing the catalogue, we searched for the perspectives of both a naturalist and an artist to expand our thoughts on these uncanny stones and the affinity they offer between nature and art. We are deeply honoured that the two friends of forty years, Sir David Attenborough and Tom Phillips, agreed to focus their masterly attention on these intriguing geological creations. Their passion, curiosity and energy are a true inspiration. 

    Please click here to view our concurrent exhibition 'Song: Chinese Ceramics, 10th to 13th Century (part 5)'

    Gogotte, Fontainebleau, France

    Height: 64.0cm
    Width: 100.0cm
    Depth: 26.0cm

  • Gogotte, Fontainebleau, France

    Gogottes: A Rift in Time

    Click here to view a video on Gogottes: A Rift in Time

    The current exhibition represents a milestone in the gallery’s history, insofar as it is the first dedicated solely to a phenomenon of nature. Gogottes are rare and intriguing sandstone concretions found in an area near Fontainebleau, in northern France. Louis XIV of France was fascinated by them and a number were used to adorn the gardens at Versailles.
     
    The fascination with natural forms and phenomena is a recurring characteristic found in Chinese cultural history and philosophy. From the Song Dynasty (960-1279), the elite and scholar classes brought natural forms, such as rocks, into the domestic context to be admired and to provide inspiration. This was a golden period for the arts where nature fed into philosophy, poetry, calligraphy and painting. Natural forms continue to be collected today. 
     
    In preparing the catalogue, we searched for the perspectives of both a naturalist and an artist to expand our thoughts on these uncanny stones and the affinity they offer between nature and art. We are deeply honoured that the two friends of forty years, Sir David Attenborough and Tom Phillips, agreed to focus their masterly attention on these intriguing geological creations. Their passion, curiosity and energy are a true inspiration. 

    Please click here to view our concurrent exhibition 'Song: Chinese Ceramics, 10th to 13th Century (part 5)'

    Gogotte, Fontainebleau, France

    Height: 49.0cm
    Width: 43.0cm
    Depth: 25.0cm